Page 3 - Market Times June 2021
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ON THE COVER
Times June 2021 FEATURES
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Guildford’s North Street Market is run by the borough council with the lightest of touches — and that’s just how the traders and their customers like it. Nicola Gould reports on a thriving Surrey market as rich in quality lines as it is in colourful characters.
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Times June 2021
Emma Findlay has been selling fruit and veg on Guildford market for 30 years and her father was a greengrocer on the market going back many more years
— p12
Going great guns in Guildford
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   Dinnington market — warm of heart 16
The accidental market that has revived a Leicestershire town 22
YTM 2021 should be fully up and running 25 Stroud’s Ken Stevens hangs up his cheese slice 25
Lisa wins top NMTF accolade for supporting Cottingham Market 31
Traders and shoppers saddened at closure
of Nelson Market 32
West Brom goes green with new solar stalls 36
Plastic carrier bags charge in force in England 42
Bolton’s Peter Entwistle is NMTF’s Market
Manager of the Year 43
Traders line up for pitch at Chester’s new market 44 Customers urged to ShopKind 44 NMTF holds virtual AGM 45 Parliamentary markets group relaunched 46 Obituary — Peter Kwapisz 47
Market Times is interactive — just click on any article on this page to so to the story. With most ads you can click to find out more, and anything highlighted in blue will provide you with more.
If you want to print pages see guidance on page 47.
Cirencester — p4
Guildford — p12
Stockton — p26
Brandon — p38
market that grew from local peo- Aple selling their surplus veg grown to meet the dire shortage of food after the First World War is now a century- old success story in up-market Guildford.
Around 20 traders set up stall on the town’s North Street, which runs parallel to the High Street, every Friday and Saturday, with fruit and veg and flowers the mainstay, as they have been for its entire history going back to August 1919. And despite the ravages of the pandemic, most traders say they are now busier than ever.
As you would expect for one of the most expensive and sought-after places to live, North Street Market is a place to buy high quality food and produce, and top notch non-food goods and services.
Yet the market retains its warmth and friendliness, thanks in large part to the diverse group of characters, some of whom have been trading on the market for 30 or 40 years.
“It’s like a family here,” said Suke Wibaut, who has run her confectionery business, Butter and Cream Cakes, on the market, with the help of her husband, Tom, for the past 12 years.
Suke is a trained caterer who saw a gap in the market to specialise in cup cakes and celebration cakes after seeing a London company making a go of it.
“The market was the perfect place to start up,” said Suke, who started making her cakes at home but now has a shop and a unit where she employs staff in nearby Milford.
“I have grown to love this market and although we have the shop we look forward to market days because it has also become a social life. Traders and customers have become friends,” said Suke, who sees her stall as the perfect showcase shop window, bringing in orders for celebration cakes.
Her husband, Tom, said: “It is a lovely market and it seems to run itself. We don’t
see much of the council and that works fine.”
The market is delegated to Guildford Borough Council’s parking department and traders say they do respond quickly if needed — but generally the market runs smoothly on its own.
What started as a local produce market soon grew to traders selling many different lines, the only rule being they had to live within 10 miles of the borough of Guildford.
In its heyday in the 1930s, the market was heaving, with traders selling china, glass, clocks, watches and much more, all hawking their wares at full pelt.
One well-known character was Garcia, the “Chocolate King” and another trader called Marks sold fabrics and army boots. Today’s market traders are also a colourful bunch with life stories to tell. They include Heidi Jones who sells flowers, and Emma Findlay who runs Unique Fruits.
Suke and Tom Wibaut run Butter and Cream Cakes, a popular cake business which has been on the market for 12 years
  Blessed be
Brandon
Market which
has a new
lease of life
Brandon Market in Suffolk offers food for the body and soul since it was trans- formed from a two-stall event to a thriving market and community hub. Nicola Gould visits a market where even the local vicar has got in on the act
arket day in the small Suffolk Mtown of Brandon used to be a depressing affair. Just two busi-
nesses — a fruit and veg seller and a fish van — would set up stall every Thursday in Market Hill, the attractive market square dominated by the town hall and the police station, and looking purpose-built for a substantial market.
Sharon Fairweather, market development officer for West Suffolk Council, spear- headed the revival of Brandon market
Despite benefiting from a great butchers and bakers, the town’s High Street was struggling. And whilst locals were loyal to the two regular stalls and nostalgic about their market, which had seen much better days, they were forced to shop out of town for the bulk of their weekly shop.
Then the pandemic struck and everything changed.
Sharon Fairweather, markets development officer for West Suffolk Council, who has spearheaded the transformation of Brandon Market, said the council looked at the situation and decided they had to do something drastic to improve the market. “Brandon has quite a lot of older
residents and many weren’t happy to get on a bus to go to a busy supermarket, so the council wanted to do everything it could to ensure they could get everything they needed in town,” she said.
It was also the perfect opportunity to
rmevarikvetw, ahnadt hinadtuorncgeivbeeanmautchhri-vnienegded fillip to the High Street.
   The impressive frontage now renovated with the formerly bricked-up archways on each side of the main entrance glazed to add to the brightness of the market
Crewe Market Hall is the new must-visit attraction in town
Crewe Market Hall will officially open on June 21, but the traders have already set up stall and locals are flocking to the new attraction in town which has undergone a £3 million transformation. Nicola Gould takes a peak before the fanfare of the formal opening.
Crewe — p18
rewe’s new-look Market Hall is now Ccomplete following a £3 million redevelopment — and the trans- formation could not be more dramatic.
Gone are the lines of tired-looking stalls and the less than inviting ambience. The Grade II listed building is now bathed in light, with the large archways at each corner opened up and glazed, and the aisles of central stalls demolished.
The open central space is now furnished
wpuitnhtewrsocoadnensitaabnledseannjodybtehnechdeivsewrsheefroeod and drink offer and there is a central stage for entertainment — everything from live music to quiz nights are already up and running.
The original stalls on the west side known as The Shambles, a striking architectural feature, have been beautifully restored. They now house hot and cold food businesses and there are three produce stalls at the north end.
New stalls have been constructed along the east side which are home to hot food and drink businesses, several non-food lines and a new barbers and nail business. It is all a far cry from 20, 30 and 40 ymearkseatgwoitwhhevnerthyedahyallinweass, farotrmadtihtieonal
vacuum cleaner repair man to the cheese and bacon stall.
The market hall can trace its roots back to the 1850s, when a cheese hall, a corn
exchange, a butter and bacon warehouse, and, finally, an outside covered market were built to establish the town as a produce centre.
Richard Gibbons, estates manager for MAM (Market Asset Management), the Colchester-based private market management company brought in to run Crewe’s markets, said the council decided to redevelop the market because it had become tired and uninviting.
inIvteistpmaernt toifnat£h5e0tomwinllicoentprreoagirmamedmaet of repositioning the Cheshire town as a prime leisure and retail destination. Richard said MAM’s sister company Quarterbridge worked with the council on
Richard Gibbons is estates manager for Mteanrdkert tAosrsuent MCraenwaegemaerknet,t whhalilchanwdotnhethe outdoor market
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 Editor: Roy Holland 01226 352808 • Assistant Editor: Vanessa Higginbottom 01226 352812 • Editorial Assistant: Rebecca Johnson 01226 352806 Journalist: Nicola Gould • Email: publicity@nmtf.co.uk
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