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ON THE COVER
Times FEATURES
June 2019
FEATURE • SCUNTHORPE 17 Scunthorpe’s new £4 million market has started life on a high note, with a waiting list for stalls and excellent footfall. Nicola Gould reports
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Times June 2019
Scotland’s largest indoor market Glasgow Forge is upping its game with significant investment and
a new team — p36
The market move with a happy ending
Winchester — p5
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Scunthorpe’s new market opens in style following £4 million investment
Scunthorpe — p16
When North Lincolnshire Council told market traders of its plans to close their existing building and move them outside, the proposal went down like a lead balloon.
Traders like Wendi Betts, who started a thriving jewellery business on the market 19 years ago, were appalled at the proposal, as were the butchers and other traders who faced losing their livelihoods because outdoor trading was not viable for them.
But all’s well that ends well. Wendi asked the NMTF for help and its advice and, combined with a petition signed by 20,000 people opposed to the plan, there was a rethink.
Jenny Couch, the council’s place development and marketing lead, said the old market building was 75 years old and had needed major investment.
The market had originally been outdoors on Market Hill, and the council must have calculated that relocating traders there would save them a pretty penny.
Once that was ruled out, it looked at a number of options including a new build, but the former BHS store next to The Parishes Shopping Centre was available and in the end the decision was made to relocate the market there.
Many of the traders remained sceptical, but contractors started work in January 2018 and the new look market opened its doors to the public on schedule on March 22.
“The old market was very dark and dated and the number of vacant units was growing,” Jenny said. “There used to be an outdoor market at the back but that died out about
10 years ago. The market was no longer in the retail heart of town — people talk about an ‘invisible barrier’ and it seems that fewer people were going out of their way to visit
the market, although it wasn’t far from its
new site, but it was not an inviting shopping environment,” she added.
The good news is that the new market, renamed St John’s after the nearby church, is already attracting great footfall and positive feedback.
Although the building is a former BHS store, it is unrecognisable as such. The only feature the designers retained were the central escalators. Everything else was swept away and a large section of the first floor used by BHS as storage has been opened up to reveal vast windows across one side, with pipes and lighting above creating a light, bright, trendy, industrial-style ambience.
The units, made from Scunthorpe-produced steel, were designed in consultation with the individual traders who would be using them. Smart metal shutters mean traders can shut up shop and open up in seconds, without worrying about their stock.
The general market, which opens 8am to 5pm Tuesdays to Saturdays, is on the ground floor, with most of the units taken by existing traders. Upstairs there is a central area of street food businesses, most of them new to the market, with a seating area to the front with a gin bar,
a café and bar, and a unit offering crêpes and other treats for those with a sweet tooth. Stalls selling everything from shabby chic products and furniture to a beauty salon and hairdressers are located on the periphery.
In the old market, the latter had a curtain across to give customers some privacy. The new units are a world away with glass frontage and bright, modern décor.
The seating area links to the adjacent cinema and multi-storey car park, so that shoppers can access the market on each level, including many who park up and walk through the market to reach the town centre. It helps that the first two hours of parking is free.
Outside are lines of bus stops and the market
        Tiverton ticks the right boxes
One of Devon’s oldest pannier markets is reasserting its position at the heart of the community. Nicola Gould reports from Tiverton
  Tiverton Market and its stunning location amid the rolling hills of mid-Devon is spot on.
The town is rich in history and heritage with a castle, a museum, two rivers and a canal. The surrounding countryside includes Dartmoor and Exmoor, yet too often tourists zoom past it en route to better-known holiday destinations. Similarly Tiverton Market is not yet the magnet it should be despite its attractive Grade II listed market hall and a £3 million investment some years ago.
The revamp back in 2007 included installing glass doors around the outside, creating a light and bright market area, a pedestrianised-style surrounding area and a line of 20 lock-up units down one side, all of which are now let to market businesses.
But Alan Ottey, who took over as market and town centre manager for Mid Devon District Council three years ago, is working hard to ensure Tiverton market reaches its potential. Alan is a long-retired police inspector who has an impressive track record in both market and town centre management. This includes stints in
Hinckley and Nuneaton and consultancy work to enhance the market offer in towns including Kingston-upon-Thames, Norwich, Romford and Farnborough.
He was tempted down to Tiverton because he loves the area from summer holidays and he was soon tackling the challenges head on.
“There were some obvious issues and one of the first investments was to give the inside of the building a thorough clean and to get the outside repainted,” Alan said.
Footfall was an issue — shoppers favour Tiverton’s larger neighbours, Taunton and Exeter.
The market was in significant deficit and it needed an influx of new traders with diverse lines to brighten up the offer.
Also, with Alan’s wider town centre remit, he was well positioned to improve partnership working in Tiverton and ensure that all stakeholders were working together to enhance the town’s many assets.
Three years into the job, Alan has made significant progress.
The financial situation has been turned around.
Alan Ottey, who has a strong track record of running markets and town centres including consultancy work, took over as Tiverton market and town centre manager three years ago
         Glasgow Forge — an inspired venture
Scotland’s largest indoor market Glasgow Forge is upping its game with some significant investment and a new team focusing on attracting new younger shoppers to this unique retail emporium. Nicola Gould reports
                                               Tiverton — p22
Glasgow Forge — p36
NEWS, REPORTS etc
Doncaster’s wool market reopens following £4.5 million transformation 20
Is Joan the UK’s oldest market trader? 34 Obituary — Fred Jefferson 34
NMTF shares its markets data for wider research
Ian and Wendy clock up 90 years in Knutsford Market
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Catford’s neighbourly market celebrates its first birthday
Ambassador Rose Dyson opens
her new HQ 13
Be part of the NMTF’s Young Traders Market 2019
15
April Market Times quiz winners 47 Market Times quiz 47
Clevedon — p42
Options for Darlington Market’s multi-million pound redevelopment
are unveiled 40
26 NMTF member benefits 46 NMTF AGM & Conference 28-33 Advertisers index 47
Editor: Roy Holland 01226 352808 • Assistant Editor: Vanessa Higginbottom 01226 352812 • Editorial Assistant: Rebecca Johnson 01226 352806 Journalist: Nicola Gould • Email: publicity@nmtf.co.uk
Market Times is published by NMTF Ltd, Hampton House, Hawshaw Lane, Hoyland, Barnsley S74 0HA.
Market Times is posted directly to around 20,000 traders, market operators and key industry decision makers. Contributions are welcomed from anyone with an interest in the markets industry.
The publisher makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the material but cannot be held responsible for any errors or inaccuracies. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the NMTF .
Designed entirely in-house © Copyright 2019 NMTF
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