Page 3 - MarketTimesDecember2019
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ON THE COVER
Times FEATURES
Over the past 18 months Ebbw Vale Market in south Wales has gone from loss making to profit, with new traders and a more positive vibe every Friday. It’s still a far cry from the boom times when the mighty steelworks employed thousands, but at least it’s moving in the right direction. NICOLA GOULD reports
Ebbw Vale — p4
An authentic London market brimming with bargains, banter and bonhomie
December 2019
It’s back to the good old days for Par Market in Cornwall, one of the country’s largest indoor markets that has returned to the winning formula created by a market trader who built it from scratch 27 years ago. NICOLA GOULD visits a revitalised market
Par — p16
An ancient Norfolk market looks to
the future
Until 2004 the market was held by the landmark town clock
Downham — p42
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Wellington — p24
Church Street — p36
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Times December 2019
Jess Russell helps out in her parents’ butchers business which has had a popular mobile unit on Downham market for many
a year — p42
FEATURE • WELLINGTON 25
Wellington Market in Shropshire was threatened with closure after the long-time private operating company went into administration. The threat prompted an outpouring of support from the local community and a new operator stepped into the breach, securing its future and promising a much-needed programme of investment. Nicola Gould reports on a heartening good news story
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List your business on the NMTF’s
new-look website — FREE! 11
Celebrating 10 years of campaign for fake-free markets 14
The market street food enterprise
saying balls to prison 15
The NMTF is going to Blackpool! 20
The architects behind eye-catching
retail market transformations 22
Trader profile – David McDonald
David Preston on his new role as Chief Executive of NABMA
28
NMTF helps Govt with major Brexit campaign 34
The market that’s marketing markets
to the tourism industry 40
Glossop traders face uncertain future 41 Raising money for a wheelchair for Tilly 41 NMTF Employers Liability Certificate 41 Market Times quiz 47 Advertisers index 47
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Wellington Market in rural Shropshire has a proud market history dating back to 1244. And the private operator that was formed to run the market many moons ago became the UK’s largest private market operator with a portfolio of 130 markets all over the country.
But times change and fortunes reverse. So when Wellington Markets Company went into administration the future of the market was uncertain and traders were worried that a lifetime of building successful market businesses could come to an end through no fault of their own. Many of the traders have been on the market for 20, 30, 40 years or more and had put their hearts and souls into their businesses.
The community in Wellington was also horrified at the prospect of losing their market which had a special place in the
town’s history and their hearts.
Herlander Alcobia, the young market manager, said all the traders were devas- tated and very worried about the future. “What was so frustrating was that this is such a good market with so many great businesses. The people of Wellington support their market and couldn’t bear
the thought of losing it,” he said.
“We received so many calls from members of the public expressing their support and asking if there was anything they could do to save the market.”
The local newspaper reported the efforts of an 11-year-old schoolgirl, Anna Wysome, who wrote to the manager, spoke to traders and designed a poster promoting the advantages of keeping it open.
Anna told the newspaper: “I think the market is a really friendly, communal place and I wanted to tell people how much it means to the place.”
Anna said she was worried about the competition from companies like Amazon and online retailers that meant people don’t need to walk into the town centre.
“So I wanted to do something to help save our beautiful, historic market,” she said. The administrators put the market up for sale alongside Morley Market in Leeds and Luton Market, which were also run by the Wellington company, better known to market people as Town and Country.
“We knew that there were two potential buyers but even so it went down to the wire,” Herlander said.
On the final day Castle Point, an inter- national property company with main offices in New York and Israel, emerged as the purchaser.
It would be their first venture into markets and the Wellington market community was hugely relieved but naturally a little apprehensive about
Church Street Market may be just down the road from Oxford Street, Park Lane and Mayfair, but it is light years away from the glitz and glamour of the West End. Nicola Gould visits a good, old-fashioned London market that reflects the community it serves
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NEWS, REPORTS etc
29 Green light for new Chester market 30
The new family-friendly Christmas market in the Salford media spotlight
NMTF’s bright young traders continue to hog the limelight
End of an era for Danny McCluskey
32
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Editor: Roy Holland 01226 352808 • Assistant Editor: Vanessa Higginbottom 01226 352812 • Editorial Assistant: Rebecca Johnson 01226 352806 Journalist: Nicola Gould • Email: publicity@nmtf.co.uk
Market Times is published by NMTF Ltd, Hampton House, Hawshaw Lane, Hoyland, Barnsley S74 0HA.
Market Times is posted directly to around 20,000 traders, market operators and key industry decision makers. Contributions are welcomed from anyone with an interest in the markets industry.
The publisher makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the material but cannot be held responsible for any errors or inaccuracies. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the NMTF .
Designed entirely in-house © Copyright 2019 NMTF
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Trendy artisan markets, street food and quirky makers markets may be popping up all over the capital, but you can’t beat an authentic London market — and Church Street is just that.
There are fruit and veg stalls aplenty, fresh fish stalls, value-for-money fashion, tables piled high with socks and shoes for shoppers to sift through — bargains galore.
But it’s not the place to shop for an expensive sourdough artisan loaf or a gateau fit for Fortnum & Mason.
And the good news for the locals is that Church Street is going to retain its identity and role as a community hub despite a multi-million pound regeneration
programme including opulent new homes as well as affordable housing that is taking shape close to the market.
Coun Tim Barnes, Westminster City Council’s cabinet member for Economic Development, Education and Skills, whose remit includes markets, said: “Market traders in the borough seem to worry that we want to close their markets down. But nothing could be further from the truth.”
He said the irony was the council was desperate to keep them going as it recognised their inherent value as places where locals could get affordable food and fresh produce with a low carbon footprint, and as hubs where people who sometimes
face isolation and loneliness can meet up, chat and feel part of the community.
The council wanted to support its markets and the traders who make a living there, but it needed traders to adapt and move with the times. He cited the need to connect them with wi-fi in a world where fewer people carry cash as a good example of positive change.
But there were no plans to gentrify the market or introduce trendy new lines at the expense of traditional market businesses, he said. Street food markets have their place and are great places to nurture new hot food businesses, he says, but traditional markets are vital too.
And he cited Berwick Street Market
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