Page 3 - MarketTimesAugust2019
P. 3

                                      PO
D
,
K
T
S
S
T
T
E
E
D
D
D
IR
IR
E
EC
C
T
T
Y
TO
A
L
Y
T
O
AR
O
R
U
O
N
U
D
2
N
D
2
5,0
0
0
Bakewell, buzzing in summer, bright and breezy all year round
,0
0
T
0
R
0
TR
AD
ER
A
D
S
A
E
R
L
S
M
L
NO
A
RK
T
O
W
N
M
A
R
P
K
E
E
R
T
O
A
T
O
P
E
R
R
S
&
K
AT
OR
E
S
&
K
YI
N
E
D
Y
IN
U
S
T
D
R
U
Y
D
S
R
E
Y
D
C
S
E
IO
C
IS
N
M
IO
N
M
A
K
A
E
K
R
E
RS
Times FEATURES
August 2019
        ON THE COVER
                                       Pontypridd indoor market is a beacon of pride and hope in a South Wales town that was devastated by the demise of coal and the decline of steel. Nicola Gould pays a visit
Pontypridd’s outdoor market, which once filled the streets to bursting every Wednesday and Saturday, may be just a shadow of its former self.
But the indoor market is thriving thanks to the efforts of the private owners of the Victorian market who have invested heavily in an ongoing programme of modernisation.
“This market is going from strength to strength,” said Tony Warwick, who has been trading here with his wife Vivienne for the past seven years selling anything and everything that he finds cool, from rock star cushions, lamps and incense to bags and fascinators.
“The company employs a gang of men working six days a week including two carpenters and a painter, and they bring in tilers and electricians when they need them.”
And the investment is bearing fruit, in particular in the food hall where work to transform the glazed roof is nearing completion. And the long- established, quality food traders have upgraded their businesses to match the bright, attractive new look.
With a third-generation butcher sourcing the finest local meat and making its own sausages on the stall; a baker who starts baking on the stall at the crack of dawn; and the market’s very own Welsh cakes stall, it compares well with any of London’s trendiest food emporiums.
And the rolling programme of improvements aims to bring the entire market up a high standard, according to market manager Keith Woods, who began his working life more than 40 years ago sweeping up the market floor and has managed the market for the past 25 years. Pontypridd, which lies at the gateway to the valleys 10 miles north of Cardiff, has boasted a vibrant market for centuries.
In the days when it was a small rural town, the drovers would bring their animals to town to sell every Wednesday and Saturday.
When coal and steel transformed the town into a hive of industrial activity the wealthy business people decided to capitalise on its success and build a market hall.
The indoor market was opened in 1877 and comprises a main market hall, the adjoining former town hall which was incorporated into the market before the turn of that century, and an adjoining annexe called Penuel Way.
The listed building, with its original stone floors and maze of halls, is now home to 65 traders offering every kind of product and service, from an impressive food offer, a vegan café and shop, to traditional lines and services including key cutting, watch repairs and a barbers.
There seems to be a busy café around every corner and the market continues to be a community hub for locals where they meet, eat, drink, shop and chat.
Keith says the market is the heart and soul of a town that has lost so much. The deep coal mined around Pontypridd was of the finest quality used to power steam ships that voyaged all over the world. Steel chains
P
L
,
E
I
O
S
Times August 2019
Graham and Jenny Knowles have been selling ladies fashion on Bakewell market for the past 49 years. Their daughter Gemma now works in the family business.
— p4
Bakewell — p4
Pontypridd — p16
Bakewell is buzzing in summer and bright and breezy all year round
    Downton Abbey deer is not dear at Taunton’s farmers’ market
 A meeting organised by the NFU is a village hall near Taunton two decades ago led to a farmers’ market which has proved one of the most successful and enduring in the South West. Nicola Gould meets traders and producers who are passionate about what they do
The Vale of Taunton Farmers’ Market in Somerset is everything you would expect of a farmers’ market and more — from the bunches of freshly picked carrots and beetroots, to the trader selling venison that he has stalked and killed on the Downton Abbey estate. But one thing it is not is pricey.
Graeme Wallace, who farms deer and sells meat, home-made pies and sausage rolls on the market, is keen to dispel that particular prejudice. Graeme helped to launch the farmers’ market in 1999 after he and a small group of farmers attended the meeting organised by the NFU who were mooting the idea of farmers cutting out the middle men and selling their produce on new local farmers’ markets.
“Taunton was my local town and it seemed the ideal place to have a farmers’ market,” Graeme said.
He and like-minded farmers formed a steering committee and approached the local council, who were happy for the town to host a farmers’ market but didn’t want to get involved in running it.
“We formed a co-operative and the first farmers’ market was held in the High Street with farmers bringing their own tables and trading under umbrellas,” he said.
It was originally a monthly market but after a year the co-operative had made enough to repay the council for the umbrellas and they decided to stage the market every Thursday.
Graeme said the market had stayed strong over the years.
“Traders have come and gone but we always manage to recruit more traders when one or two leave,” he said.
The co-operative must be doing something right because they have won gold in the Taste of the West awards for the past five years and
      Hitchin’s Cinderella market deserves to be centre stage
Despite its place at the heart of Hitchin’s history and heritage, the ancient market has a Cinderella status, tucked away behind the impressive main square, hidden from view. Nicola Gould visits a market that deserves to be the star of the show
There is good and bad news about Hitchin Market in North Hertfordshire. The bad news is its location on a paved square ocoffnCcrheutercshoYpaprdinbgecheindtreC,hourtcohfgsaitgeh, taodfathede, beautiful, large cobbled main square, with its central clock tower and backcloth of historic, listed buildings.
The square attracts every type of event from continental markets to car shows.
It has even been the chosen location for TV adverts in which the ugly Churchgate was electronically removed. The problem has been
that, with the market hidden away, the events in the square have tended to drain footfall from the market, rather than boost it. traTcheeigtsoroodontsewbascikstohaRtothmeamn arnkdetS,awxhoinchtimcaens, is still doing well on Fridays and Saturdays, with 100 stalls under fixed cover, a great mix of food and traditional market lines, and an additional 60 gazebos when needed.
It is rated as the second most important reason for visiting Hitchin.
The bad news is that the Tuesday market is struggling.
Ron Piper, who many years ago sold tights and stockings on the market and took over as manager two years ago, said there was hope on thTeheonriaztounra.l home for the market is the market square, where it took pride of place for centuries, but a return there is not very practical and unlikely to happen.
It moved from the market place to a large car park last century and Ron recently found an old black and white photograph, dated 1953, of the market booming there, with traders selling jellied eels, budgerigars, puppies and kittens.
  A perfect harbour location for a buoyant art and
craft market
Replica of Sir Francis Drake’s Golden Hind is berthed alongside Brixham’s art and craft market
Brixham’s art and craft market, which takes place every Wednesday and Saturday from Easter to October, is more than just a tourist attraction.
Nicola Gould visits a Devon market that has proved a launch pad for creative locals, raised money for good causes and become an integral part of community life
It’s hard to imagine a more idyllic setting for a market than the old fish market in Brixham, with artists and crafts people selling their creations on the town’s picturesque harbour, and where a replica of Sir Francis Drake’s Golden Hind floats nearby.
And it’s hard to believe there is another market with such a strong track record for nurturing artistic local talent and entrepreneurship, at the same time as contributing to the local community.
Brixham Art and Craft Market was established back in 2007 by the harbour side, under the canopy where local trawler and fishermen once sold their catches.
Unlike so many UK ports, the fishing industry in Brixham in south Devon has thrived and new facilities were built some years ago, which freed up the old site.
The combination of a busy fishing fleet and burgeoning tourism has stood Brixham in good stead over the years.
So the establishment of a market in this prime spot, which added to
the town’s traditional pannier market offer, must have seemed like a great proposition. Professional photographer Chris Slack, who now manages the market for Brixham Chamber of
Commerce, had a stall on the first market and traded there for 11 years before investing in a shop. “Initially it was more of a
general market,” said Chris, who is originally from London where
  Hitchin — p22
Brixham — p36
Taunton Farmers — p42
NMTF member benefits
NEWS, REPORTS etc
11 Todmorden inspired Totally Locally 26
International public markets conference 13 in London 27
To be or not to be on Bridge Street? 40
Cottingham on lookout
for new traders 46
Make use of the NMTF app 46 June Market Times quiz winners 47 Market Times quiz 47
Huddersfield Queensgate trader face move
Young Traders Market 2019
Halfway through Go Trade project 15 New website, free business listings 20
15 Plans for Bradford’s food market 28 Annual parliamentary reception 30 Chesham and Amersham go green 32
Editor: Roy Holland 01226 352808 • Assistant Editor: Vanessa Higginbottom 01226 352812 • Editorial Assistant: Rebecca Johnson 01226 352806 Journalist: Nicola Gould • Email: publicity@nmtf.co.uk
 Market Times is published by NMTF Ltd, Hampton House, Hawshaw Lane, Hoyland, Barnsley S74 0HA.
Market Times is posted directly to around 20,000 traders, market operators and key industry decision makers. Contributions are welcomed from anyone with an interest in the markets industry.
The publisher makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the material but cannot be held responsible for any errors or inaccuracies. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the NMTF .
Designed entirely in-house © Copyright 2019 NMTF
NMTF direct lines and emails:
Chief Executive: 01226 352800 joe.harrison@nmtf.co.uk Communications Manager: 01226 352808 roy.holland@nmtf.co.uk Projects Manager: 01226 352804 chris.savage@nmtf.co.uk Production and Events Manager: 01226 352812 vanessa.higginbottom@nmtf.co.uk
PA to CE: 01226 352805 tracey.jones@nmtf.co.uk
Secretariat: 01226 352815 julie.lane@nmtf.co.uk
Market Times Ad Sales: 01226 352815 georgia.blower@nmtf.co.uk
For membership enquiries call 01226 749021
www.nmtf.co.uk
@marketsmatter /thenmtf @marketsmatter /hamptonhouse
t
t
t
   1   2   3   4   5